4th Workshop

Practical aspects of culturing and monitoring Purple Bacteria mixed and pure cultures

18 April 2024

Lisbon – Portugal

4th workshop

KEY DATES

    • Celebration date: 18th April of 2024, Lisboa, Portugal
    • Final date to apply for funding: 23rd February 2024
    • Communication, confirmation and funding (if applicable in the form of reimbursement): 4th March 2024
    • Early bird registration: 31th March 2024

COST Action

COST Action CA21146

COST Action CA21146 is a four-year networking action that aims at creating a European network to share information, facilitating technology and knowledge transfer between the academic and industrial sectors, related to Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria (PPB) applications for resource recovery from organic waste sources. Resource recovery includes wastewater or organic waste, open or closed environments, in single or chain processes.

The network associates fundamental-focused and applied research groups, improving lab-scale technology optimization through mechanistic modeling. It benefits the technology transfer from applied-research groups to industry, considerably improving process design. PURPLEGAIN also aims to create a database for techno-economic, social and environmental impacts studies, which facilitates the marketability of both the PPB-based technologies and the products to extract. Some focused products are polyhydroxyalkanoates, single-cell proteins, biomass for energy, biomass as fertilizer, biohydrogen, carotenoids, terpenoids, organic acids, coenzyme Q10, and 5-aminolevulinic acid.

COST

COST is an intergovernmental framework for European Cooperation in Science and Technology established to initiate networking and coordination of nationally funded research activities on a European level. It facilitates bringing good scientists together under light strategic guidance based on networks, called COST Actions, centred around research projects in fields that are of interest to COST countries and cooperating countries.

4th Workshop

Presentation

The workshop is organized by Dr. Joana Fradinho (Vice Chair and head of the local organizing committee), Dr. Daniel Puyol (Chair), Dr. Gabriel Capson Tojo (Working Group 2 Leader), Dr. Luis Diaz Allegue, WG2 co-Leader, Dr. Raul Muñoz Torre – Grant Awarding Coordinator, Dr. Ioanna Vasiliadou (Training Schools Coordinator), in the frame of WG 2: Resource recovery from waste and wastewater and downstream procedures for PPB biomass of the COST action (CA21146) – PURPLEGAIN.

  • Celebration date: 18th April 2024, Lisboa, Portugal
  • Key dates:
    • Final date to apply for funding: 23rd February 2024.
    • Communication, confirmation and funding (if applicable in the form of reimbursement): 4th March 2024.
    • Early bird registration: 31st March 2024.
  • Registration: Fourth Workshop – Registration
  • Organizing committee: Dr. Joana Fradinho (Vice Chair and head of the local organizing committee), Dr. Daniel Puyol (Chair), Dr. Gabriel Capson Tojo (Working Group 2 Leader), Dr. Luis Diaz Allegue, WG2 co-Leader, Dr. Raul Muñoz Torre – Grant Awarding Coordinator, Dr. Ioanna Vasiliadou (Training Schools Coordinator).
    Scope

    PURPLEGAIN aims to create a European network to share information, facilitating technology and knowledge transfer between the academic and industrial sectors, related to PPB applications for resource recovery from organic waste sources. Resource recovery includes wastewater or organic waste, open or closed environments, in single or chain processes. The network associates fundamental-focused and applied-research groups, improving lab-scale technology optimization through mechanistic modeling. It benefits the technology transfer from applied-research groups to industry, considerably improving process design.

    PURPLEGAIN also aims to create a database for techno-economic, social and environmental impacts studies, which facilitates the marketability of both the PPB-based technologies and the products to extract. Some focused products are polyhydroxyalkanoates, single-cell proteins, biomass for energy, biomass as fertilizer, biohydrogen, carotenoids, terpenoids, organic acids, coenzyme Q10, and 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    Accordingly, the workshop in the frame of Working Group 2, which coordinates the initiatives focused on applied research, exploring operational strategies for combined product development, is focused on two main Topics:

    • First Topic:  Wastewater treatment with purple phototrophic bacteria and resource recovery from organic waste sources in purple photo-biorefineries
    • Second Topic: Downstream processing: advances in extraction and purification of high added-value molecules, and engineering challenges: scale-up of photo-bioreactors, including control and light integration.
    Call for participating

    This is a call for participating in the 4th Workshop “Practical aspects of culturing and monitoring Purple Bacteria mixed and pure cultures” in the frame of WG 2: Resource recovery from waste and wastewater and downstream procedures for PPB biomass of the COST action (CA21146) – PURPLEGAIN.

    We invite abstract contributions for oral presentations to this interdisciplinary workshop from all academic disciplines (PhD students, young researchers, post-doctoral and senior researchers, and professors) and other stakeholders.

    Due to the Council Decision 2022/2056, as of 4 July 2023 and until further notice: 

    • Participation and eligibility of COST Action participants affiliated with Hungarian legal entities implied by the Council Decision shall be suspended for all COST Actions and COST activities. Therefore, these COST Action participants shall not be invited to participate in any type of Action activities. The Grant Holders must cancel the attendance of any Hungarian participants invited before 4 July to future Action activities. If these participants already incurred non-refundable expenses prior to 4 July, they are invited to contact the Administrative Officer of the respective Action.
    • Management Committee and Working Group participants affiliated with Hungarian legal entities implied by the Council Decision are suspended from this role. In case Actions receive new MC or WG membership applications from the affected Hungarian legal entities, please note that the request(s) cannot be approved. The MC should decline any new WG membership requests from any members of the said Hungarian institutions;
    • No Action activity is allowed to take place in any of these concerned Hungarian institutions;
    • No Hungarian participants affiliated with the said mentioned institutions shall be invited or reimbursed for attending any Action activity after 4 July. Any such reimbursement will be removed from e-COST and the paid expenses will be borne by the Grant Holder Institutions.

    In this regard, the Annex I of Level A Country and Organisations table has been updated to include these measures.

    Please consult the list of above-mentioned institutions here: List of institutions affected by Council Implementing Decision 2022/2056.

    Should you have any further questions, please contact the GH Manager of your Action

    Rules for abstract submission
    Venue

    The PurpleWeek will take place at NOVA School of Science and Technology (FCT NOVA). As seen on the map, the venue is located on the south side of Tagus River, with Lisbon located on the north side of the river. The airport and some recommended hotels are also highlighted.

    Within the NOVA School of Science and Technology campus, the Workshop event will take place at the Auditorium of the Library Building (18th April) (see map below).

    Map of NOVA School of Science and Technology campus, the Workshop event will take place at the Auditorium of the Library Building

    Program

    8:30-9:00 | Registration

    9:00-13:00 | Session I.

    Key-note lecturer

    09:00 – 10:00 | Dr. Baptiste Leroy (Professor, Department of Proteomics and Microbiology, Université de Mons)

    Studying and optimising your purple process: blend or pure origin?
    Q

    The mighty power of photosynthesis

    Planet Earth sustains all its life forms by exploiting photosynthesis, a paramount biological process performed by plants, algae, and some bacteria. Photosynthesis is the sole biological process able to fix energy on Earth by harvesting sunlight. The planetary relevance of such metabolic process was clear to Giacomo Ciamician, one of the founders of modern photochemistry who delivered a visionary in 1912 speech [1] on the urgency of substituting fossil fuels with “The enormous quantity of energy that the Earth receives from the sun”, anticipating by more than one century what is now an almost universally shared opinion.
    Two wars, the availability and handiness of fossil fuels and many skeptical world’s leaders have pushed the much-needed deadline for leaving the carbon based energy production further and further. Eventually, spurred by the vision of Ciamician, at the end of the last century the idea of artificial photosynthesis for producing sustainable energy kicked in the scientific community.
    Twenty some years and many attempts later, awareness struck: complexity is the key to harness the energy from the Sun and no matter how hard you try, you cannot outdo the primary energy transducers fine-tuned by billions of years of evolution. A lesson learned the hard way, similarly to the way Pinocchio [2] learnt his after meeting the Fox and the Cat, agreed to reach the Field of Wonders in the City of Simple Simons and bury coins.
    More recently, the possibility to use whole, metabolically active photosynthetic organisms in technological applications is gaining momentum in the scientific community. Results appear interesting and promising. In other words, if you can’t beat photosynthetic organisms, join them!
    The recent attempts made in our laboratory to harness light and exploit it [3-7] are a useful little roadmap to employ photosynthetic bacteria in environmental applications.

    Invited speakers

    10:00 – 10:30 | Dr. Tuba Hande Erguder (Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University)

    Integration of photo-fermentation to dark fermentation and methanogenesis to improve energy production.
    Q

    The mighty power of photosynthesis

    Planet Earth sustains all its life forms by exploiting photosynthesis, a paramount biological process performed by plants, algae, and some bacteria. Photosynthesis is the sole biological process able to fix energy on Earth by harvesting sunlight. The planetary relevance of such metabolic process was clear to Giacomo Ciamician, one of the founders of modern photochemistry who delivered a visionary in 1912 speech [1] on the urgency of substituting fossil fuels with “The enormous quantity of energy that the Earth receives from the sun”, anticipating by more than one century what is now an almost universally shared opinion.
    Two wars, the availability and handiness of fossil fuels and many skeptical world’s leaders have pushed the much-needed deadline for leaving the carbon based energy production further and further. Eventually, spurred by the vision of Ciamician, at the end of the last century the idea of artificial photosynthesis for producing sustainable energy kicked in the scientific community.
    Twenty some years and many attempts later, awareness struck: complexity is the key to harness the energy from the Sun and no matter how hard you try, you cannot outdo the primary energy transducers fine-tuned by billions of years of evolution. A lesson learned the hard way, similarly to the way Pinocchio [2] learnt his after meeting the Fox and the Cat, agreed to reach the Field of Wonders in the City of Simple Simons and bury coins.
    More recently, the possibility to use whole, metabolically active photosynthetic organisms in technological applications is gaining momentum in the scientific community. Results appear interesting and promising. In other words, if you can’t beat photosynthetic organisms, join them!
    The recent attempts made in our laboratory to harness light and exploit it [3-7] are a useful little roadmap to employ photosynthetic bacteria in environmental applications.

    10:30 – 11:15 |Student Presentation

    Oral presentations from applicants (12 min presentations + 3 min questions)
    Q

    Phototrophic bacterium harvests light energy using both bacteriochlorophyll-containing photosyntems as well as proton-pumping rhodopsins

    Bacterium Sphingomonas glacialis AAP5 isolated from the alpine lake Gossenköllesee contains genes for anoxygenic phototrophy as well as proton-pumping xanthorhodopsin. However, these genes are not expressed in standard laboratory conditions. In order to find under which conditions the organisms expresses its light harvesting apparatus we conducted a larger investigation employing RNA sequen-cing, RTqPCR, metabolic assays and biochemical and biophysical investigation of its photosynthetic complexes. We found out that our strain readily express xanthorhodopsin when illuminated at tempera-tures below 14°C. In contrast bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction centers are expressed between 4 and 23°C in the dark. Thus, cells grown at low temperature under natural light-dark cycle produced both photosystems (Fig. 1). The photosynthetic complexes consist of the type-2 reaction center surrounded by circular light-harvesting complex 1. The purified xanthorhodopsin contains carotenoid nostoxanthin serving as an auxiliary antenna and performs the standard photocycle. The xantho-rhodopsin-producing cells reduced upon illumination their respiration by 70%. This documents that the harvested light energy was utilized in the metabolism, which can represent a large benefit under carbon-limiting conditions.
    The presence of two different photosystems may represent a metabolic advantage in alpine lakes where photoheterotrophic organisms face large changes in irradiance, limited organic substrates and low temperature.

    11:15-11:45 | Coffee-Break

    11:45 – 13:00 |Student Presentation

    Oral presentations from applicants (12 min presentations + 3 min questions)
    Q

    Phototrophic bacterium harvests light energy using both bacteriochlorophyll-containing photosyntems as well as proton-pumping rhodopsins

    Bacterium Sphingomonas glacialis AAP5 isolated from the alpine lake Gossenköllesee contains genes for anoxygenic phototrophy as well as proton-pumping xanthorhodopsin. However, these genes are not expressed in standard laboratory conditions. In order to find under which conditions the organisms expresses its light harvesting apparatus we conducted a larger investigation employing RNA sequen-cing, RTqPCR, metabolic assays and biochemical and biophysical investigation of its photosynthetic complexes. We found out that our strain readily express xanthorhodopsin when illuminated at tempera-tures below 14°C. In contrast bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction centers are expressed between 4 and 23°C in the dark. Thus, cells grown at low temperature under natural light-dark cycle produced both photosystems (Fig. 1). The photosynthetic complexes consist of the type-2 reaction center surrounded by circular light-harvesting complex 1. The purified xanthorhodopsin contains carotenoid nostoxanthin serving as an auxiliary antenna and performs the standard photocycle. The xantho-rhodopsin-producing cells reduced upon illumination their respiration by 70%. This documents that the harvested light energy was utilized in the metabolism, which can represent a large benefit under carbon-limiting conditions.
    The presence of two different photosystems may represent a metabolic advantage in alpine lakes where photoheterotrophic organisms face large changes in irradiance, limited organic substrates and low temperature.

    12:30-14:30 | Lunch Break

    14:30-16:00 | SESSION II.

    Key-note lecturer

    14:30 – 15:30 | Dr. Roberto De Philippis (Professor, Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI) – University of Florence)

    Photobioreactor design and illumination systems for H2 production with PNSB
    Q

    Purple phototrophs, electricity, and the circular economy

    The Bose lab studies microbial metabolisms and their influence on biogeochemical cycling using a transdisciplinary approach. We apply the knowledge we gain to generate new ways of addressing issues such climate change, sustainability, and the circular economy. My lab’s recent work has focused on the ability of microbes to use solid-phase conductive materials as electron donors. The ability to use electrons from minerals and other solid-phase conductive materials (in essence using electricity) is called “Extracellular Electron Uptake” or (EEU). EEU fundamentally changes our perception of the ecological role of microbes (including phototrophs) in nature because it suggests that abundant elements (such as iron) can serve as electron sources for microbial productivity and survival. In addition, our work suggests that EEU might be a fundamental process that underlies microbial energy conservation ranging from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to the human body. The Bose lab has pioneered technologies to study EEU, driven fundamental knowledge in the field, and laid a solid foundation of tools and approaches to answer key questions about EEU in nature. We have applied this knowledge to produce carbon-negative bioplastics and carbon-neutral biofuels. Currently, we are pursuing fundamental and applied research on phototrophic EEU, and determining its role in microbial ecology in marine and freshwater ecosystems. We are leveraging this knowledge to develop a variety of climate technologies for the circular economy.

    Invited speakers

    15:30 – 16:00 | Dr. Haifeng Lu

    TBD
    Q

    Purple phototrophs, electricity, and the circular economy

    The Bose lab studies microbial metabolisms and their influence on biogeochemical cycling using a transdisciplinary approach. We apply the knowledge we gain to generate new ways of addressing issues such climate change, sustainability, and the circular economy. My lab’s recent work has focused on the ability of microbes to use solid-phase conductive materials as electron donors. The ability to use electrons from minerals and other solid-phase conductive materials (in essence using electricity) is called “Extracellular Electron Uptake” or (EEU). EEU fundamentally changes our perception of the ecological role of microbes (including phototrophs) in nature because it suggests that abundant elements (such as iron) can serve as electron sources for microbial productivity and survival. In addition, our work suggests that EEU might be a fundamental process that underlies microbial energy conservation ranging from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to the human body. The Bose lab has pioneered technologies to study EEU, driven fundamental knowledge in the field, and laid a solid foundation of tools and approaches to answer key questions about EEU in nature. We have applied this knowledge to produce carbon-negative bioplastics and carbon-neutral biofuels. Currently, we are pursuing fundamental and applied research on phototrophic EEU, and determining its role in microbial ecology in marine and freshwater ecosystems. We are leveraging this knowledge to develop a variety of climate technologies for the circular economy.

    16:00-16:30 | Coffee-Break

    16:30-18:30 | Round table discussion on “A guide for established protocols for PPB based products including economic prospects”

    Moderators: Dr. Joana Fradinho (Vice Chair and head of the local organizing committee), Dr. Gabriel Capson Tojo (Working Group 2 Leader)
    Q

    Purple phototrophs, electricity, and the circular economy

    The Bose lab studies microbial metabolisms and their influence on biogeochemical cycling using a transdisciplinary approach. We apply the knowledge we gain to generate new ways of addressing issues such climate change, sustainability, and the circular economy. My lab’s recent work has focused on the ability of microbes to use solid-phase conductive materials as electron donors. The ability to use electrons from minerals and other solid-phase conductive materials (in essence using electricity) is called “Extracellular Electron Uptake” or (EEU). EEU fundamentally changes our perception of the ecological role of microbes (including phototrophs) in nature because it suggests that abundant elements (such as iron) can serve as electron sources for microbial productivity and survival. In addition, our work suggests that EEU might be a fundamental process that underlies microbial energy conservation ranging from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to the human body. The Bose lab has pioneered technologies to study EEU, driven fundamental knowledge in the field, and laid a solid foundation of tools and approaches to answer key questions about EEU in nature. We have applied this knowledge to produce carbon-negative bioplastics and carbon-neutral biofuels. Currently, we are pursuing fundamental and applied research on phototrophic EEU, and determining its role in microbial ecology in marine and freshwater ecosystems. We are leveraging this knowledge to develop a variety of climate technologies for the circular economy.

    Accommodation and Transportation information

    Room rates

    1. Room rates of Mercure Lisboa Almada Hotel (Located on the South side of Tagus River)

    AppellationRoom rates in EUR/room/night
    Single roomEUR 80 (VAT included)
    Single room with breakfastEUR 90 (VAT included)
    Double room with breakfastEUR 100 (VAT included)

    2. Room rates for HF Hotels:  HF Fénix Lisboa / HF Fénix Urban / HF Fénix Garden / HF Fénix Music (Located in Lisbon city center)

    PurpleWeek has an agreement with HF Hotels with a dedicated website link where you can choose among 4 HF hotels and make your reservation with discount prices for the event (prices are per room). Note that the prices are not fixed and may change until the celebration date of the event.

    Link:   https://purpleweek24.hfhotels.com/corporate/

    About the price

    In order to make reservations please send an email to ha040-re@accor.com. In the email please indicate the code PWEEK-FCT to have access to the mentioned prices.

    Payment method

    Reservations can be paid in advance through bank transfer (up to 3 days before arrival) or locally at the hotel. Once you make the reservation via email, the Hotel will provide you the details to make the bank transfer.

    Parking

    There is on-site free covered car parking

     

    Penalty-free cancellation deadline

    • Penalty-free cancellation deadline: participants can cancel their reservation up until a week before upon arrival without penalty.
    • Penalty: After the deadline, the price will be charged in full.
    Transportation information

    Transports at Humberto Delgado Airport, Lisbon

    Humberto Delgado Airport, Lisbon is the nearest airport and there is a variety of transportation options to ensure smooth connectivity to and from the airport.

    1. Taxi Services and Ride-Sharing Apps:  located outside the terminals.
    2. Public Transportation: Lisbon Airport is well-integrated into the city’s public transportation network.
      1. Metro: The red line (linha vermelha) of the Lisbon Metro serves the airport and provides a quick and cost-effective way to reach different parts of Lisbon. Passengers can access the metro station from Terminal 1.
      2. Buses: Various bus routes operate from the airport, serving different areas within Lisbon and its surroundings. Passengers can find bus stops conveniently located outside both Terminal 1 and Terminal 2.

    Transports at the venue, Nova School of Science and Technology (FCT NOVA)

    When considering your options be aware that Nova School of Science and Technology (FCT NOVA) is not located in the city center of Lisbon but on the south side of the Tagus River. Nevertheless, the campus is easily accessible through several public transportation.

    1. Taxi or Ride-Sharing: Taxi and ride-sharing services are readily available in the area. You can use apps like Uber or Bolt to conveniently reach the campus. It takes about 15 to 25 minutes to arrive at FCT NOVA from Lisbon (prices around 15€).* This is the recommended transportation choice for those staying in Lisbon
    2. Public Transportation: FCT NOVA is well-connected by public transportation. You can reach the campus by:
      1. Bus: Several bus lines connect the campus with different parts of Lisbon and neighbouring areas. Check the official website of the Carris Metropolitana for detailed bus routes and schedules.
        1. Bus (to Monte da Caparica (FCT)): https://www.carrismetropolitana.pt/planeador/
      2. Train: The nearest train station is Pragal. From there, you can take a bus, taxi or metro to reach FCT NOVA. Trains run frequently from Lisbon’s main stations such as Roma-Areeiro, Entrecampos, Sete Rios and Campolide.
        1. Train (to Pragal): https://www.fertagus.pt/pt/viajar/mapa-de-rede
        2. Metro (to Universidade): https://www.mts.pt/horarios/

    Transportation Guide from Mercure Lisboa Almada Hotel and HF Fénix (Lisbon) to FCT NOVA venue

      1. From Mercure Lisboa Almada Hotel:

      • By Public Transportation: Metro (to Universidade): https://www.mts.pt/horarios/
      • Take a short walk (about 4 min.) to the Ramalha metro station, board on the metro heading to Universidade, and exit at the Universidade stop (~15 min).
      • Direct buses, taxis or ride-sharing (Uber, Bolt) are also available.Bus (to Monte da Caparica (FCT)): https://www.carrismetropolitana.pt/planeador/

      2. From HF Fénix:

      For those staying at the HF Fénix hotels (located in Marquês de Pombal, Lisbon), the easiest and direct route to reach FCT NOVA is by using a taxi or a ride-sharing service app such as Uber or Bolt (15 to 25 min).

      By public transportation:

      Bus (to Monte da Caparica (FCT)): https://www.carrismetropolitana.pt/planeador/

       

      Take a short walk to the bus stop Marquês de Pombal (P6), board on 3709 bus heading towards Costa da Caparica (Terminal) and exit at Monte da Caparica (FCT) stop, which is right in front of FCT NOVA campus.

      Besides the 3709 bus, previously mentioned, other buses are heading to Monte da Caparica (FCT) stop, departing nearby the HF Félix hotels easily accessed by metro (blue line from Marques de Pombal or Parque station):

      • In Sete Rios and Praça de Espanha, bus 3711 (heading to Monte da Caparica (FCT)
      • In Sete Rios and Praça de Espanha, bus 3705 (heading to Charneca da Caparica (centro)
      • In Praça de Espanha, bus 3710 (heading to Costa da Caparica (terminal)

        Financial Support – Application procedure for reimbursement

        Documentation for applying

        The documentation needed for applying for reimbursement are as follows:

        1. Applicants must upload a short Curriculum Vitae (in English).
        2. Applicants must upload a motivation letter (in English).
        3. Applicants must upload a scanned copy of their passport (if applicants do not have a passport, they can upload their national ID card)

        Selection criteria

        The selection criteria for participants that will be eligible for reimbursement will comply with the COST Excellence and Inclusiveness Policy, in the implementation of the Action and will encourage attendance by a diverse selection of participants in consideration of:

        1. Underrepresented groups, including those with disabilities. Priority will be given to underrepresented groups, including those with disabilities.
        2. Gender balance.
        3. The level of involvement of Inclusiveness Target Countries (ITCs). Priority will be given to participants form Inclusiveness Target Countries. The current list of ITCs include Albania, Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Croatia, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Republic of North Macedonia, Republic of Serbia, Turkey and Ukraine.
        4. The level of involvement of Early Career Investigators (ECIs). Priority will be given to PhD students and young post-doctoral researchers, followed by senior post-doctoral researchers and professors.
        5. In addition, Training School organizers may also consider other special attributes such as
          1. Type, or level of expertise in the field of the Workshop based on the curriculum vitae,
          2. Appropriate core knowledge and understanding
          3. Willingness to participate based on the motivation letter
          4. Demonstrated interest based on the motivation letter
          5. The positive impact that the participants will have on the applicant’s future carrier
          6. Willingness to make a presentation in the Workshop session.
        Financial support

        Financial support through reimbursement does not necessarily cover all expenses but is a contribution to the overall travel, accommodation and meal expenses.

        The financial contribution for each successful applicant shall respect the following criteria:

        • Up to a maximum of EUR 650 in total can be afforded to each successful applicant from ITC country.
        • Up to a maximum of EUR 450 in total can be afforded to each successful applicant from non-ITC country.
        • Up to a maximum of EUR 150 in total can be afforded to each successful applicant from Portugal (distances > 100km from the Workshop Venue).

        Please remind that this financial contribution must be understood as a financial aid aimed to help applicants to cover the expenses of their participation in the Workshop. This financial aid does not aim to cover 100% of the expenses.

        Please see the General Rules to be reimbursed (https://purplegain.eu).

        Evaluation process and result announcement

        Evaluation process

        The selection committee, composed of the Action Chair, the Vice Chair, the Grant Awarding coordinator, the Training Schools Coordinator and the WG2 Leader and co-Leader, will evaluate the applications within an 18-days period (after the abstract submission deadline) and will inform all the applicants for their evaluation results. The successful applicants will then receive an e-mail from the grant holder (Grant Letter Notification), stating the official approval of the reimbursement, the granted budget and a payment request form which has to be completed after the completion of the Workshop.

        Criteria of reimbursement

        If the amount of reimbursement by all applications within a call does not exceed the available budget, the applications are handled by the selection committee. If there are more applications than funding is available, the following procedure takes place.

        1. A list of all applications (containing an informative summary) is distributed to all members of the selection committee in form of a table in which every evaluator can mark which applications he or she can evaluate according to their field of expertise.
        2. To guarantee a fair and objective evaluation, an evaluator should have no affiliation with neither the home nor the host institution of the application in question.
        3. All applications are evaluated by two members of the selection committee. The Grant Awarding coordinator distributes the proposals to the individual evaluators.
        4. The criteria given in the table below shall be applied for evaluation. The first criterion (a) is assessed by the Grant Awarding coordinator prior to the evaluation process.
        CriterionMax. points
        a) Before any further criteria are considered
        Application is complete and fulfils all formal requirementspass/no pass
        The application will be ranked last if the applicant was granted in previous callpass/no pass
        b) Evaluation of the proposal
        Applicant from ITC country0 or 10
        Applicant is ECI (or promotes gender balance)0 or 10
        Impact on the career of the applicant15
        Willingness to participate based on the motivation letter10
        Willingness to make a presentation in the Workshop session10
        CV of the applicant10
        Relevance to the objectives of PurpleGain Action20

         

        1. The evaluators report their evaluations to the Grant Awarding coordinator.
        2. The Grant Awarding coordinator ranks all evaluations and then reports the final result to the selection committee to be discussed and accepted.
        3. The applicants are informed about the decision reached.

        More information

        For further information, you may contact the

         PurpleGAIN

        IMPACT TO SCIENCE, SOCIETY AND COMPETITIVENESS